Explore the diverse and mutual bonds of spirituality and religion from around the world.

 

 

Examine and try to answer the age-old questions of religion and spirituality:

• What is sacred?

• What is the meaning and purpose of existence?

• How do these beliefs affect our day-to-day lives?

 

At Huntington, our Religious Studies program does not promote or undermine any particular religion or worldview. Instead, our faculty focus their areas of expertise on lived experiences and the phenomena of religion and spirituality within contemporary culture.

 

In this program, you’ll study:

 

  • Relationship between religion and culture.
  • Religion as a social phenomenon.
  • How religions have been a central part of virtually all civilizations throughout history.

 

Religious Studies is a three or four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Arts.

 

Ontario Secondary School Applicants:

 

  • 1 grade 12 English U/M course
  • 5 other grade 12 U/M courses 
  • A minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses

 

Additional information for applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses.

 

Additional information for applicants who have completed the International Baccalaureate.

 

Additional information for applicants, including international students, mature students and out-of-provice students can be found here.

BACHELOR OF ARTS (4 YEAR) IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Total 120 credits

 

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

SPECIALIZATION IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

 

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

 

Although the requirements have been slotted in first year in the description below, students may fulfill them at any time during their studies.

 

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

 

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization.

 

First Year

 

6 credits from:

 

RLST 1005E - What in the World is Religion?

RLST 1106E - Religion for the New Generation I
RLST 1107E - Religion for the New Generation II
RLST 1116E - Ideas of Love I
RLST 1117E - Ideas of Love II

6 elective credits of linguistic awareness (see regulations)
6 elective credits in the Sciences
6 elective credits in Indigenous content (starting 2017)
6 elective credits

 

Second and Third Years

 

6 RLST credits from three of the four areas (18 credits in all)
12 additional RLST credits at the 2000 or 3000 level*

30 elective credits

 

Fourth Year

 

12 RLST credits at the 4000 level
12 additional upper year RLST credits*
6 elective credits

 

* Students must complete at least 6 RLST credits at the 3000 level
 
Note: Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

MAJOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

 

6 credits from:

 

RLST 1005E - What in the World is Religion?
RLST 1106E - Religion for the New Generation I
RLST 1107E - Religion for the New Generation II
RLST 1116E - Ideas of Love I
RLST 1117E - Ideas of Love II

 

6 RLST credits from three of the four areas (18 credits in all)
6 RLST credits at the 4000 level
12 additional upper year RLST credits
78 elective credits**

 

Notes: 
 
Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

In order to get a BA, students must include 6 credits in linguistic awareness, 6 credits of Indigenous content, and 6 credits in the Sciences if not part of the other minor or second major. 

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

Students must complete a minimum of a minor (24 credits) or a second major (42 credits) from among their elective credits.


BACHELOR OF ARTS (3 YEAR) IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Total 90 credits

 

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

 

CONCENTRATION IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (36 CREDITS)

 

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

 

Although the requirements have been slotted in first year in the description below, students may fulfill them at any time during their studies.

 

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

 

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization.

 

First Year

 

6 credits from:

 

RLST 1005E - What in the World is Religion? 

RLST 1106E - Religion for the New Generation I

RLST 1107E - Religion for the New Generation II

RLST 1116E - Ideas of Love I

RLST 1117E - Ideas of Love II

 

6 elective credits of linguistic awareness (see regulations)
6 elective credits in the Sciences
6 elective credits in Indigenous content (starting 2017)
6 elective credits

 

Upper Years

 

6 RLST credits from three of the four areas (18 credits in all)
12 additional RLST credits at the 2000 or 3000 level
30 elective credits
 
Note: Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.
 

 

MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

 

6 credits from:

 

RLST 1005E - What in the World is Religion?

RLST 1106E - Religion for the New Generation I

RLST 1107E - Religion for the New Generation II

RLST 1116E - Ideas of Love I

RLST 1117E - Ideas of Love II

 

6 RLST credits at the 3000 level
12 additional upper year RLST credits

As per the degree requirements students must complete 6 RLST credits from three of the four areas (18 credits in all). 

 

Please note that courses listed are subject to change and may not be offered every term.


Huntington University - Study Areas in Religious Studies 

 

RLST 1106: Religion for a New Generation I

This course will examine the effect of pluralism and secularization on organized religion and individual belief in Canada. Major themes to be considered are: the new Catholic majority, the no religion factor, the demise of mainline Protestantism and the emergence of born again, fundamentalist and Pentecostal Protestantism. The course will attempt to identify the meaning and function of religion in light of these trends. (H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 1106 and RLST 1105.

 

RLST 1107: Religion for a New Generation II

This course will explore the current search for fulfillment and transcendence through examining new spiritual trends in Canada such as New Age Religion, Eastern Transcendentalism, Neo-Paganism (Aboriginal, Wiccan and Celtic), Alternate Medical Therapies, and Implicit Spirituality (as found in work, sport, political activism and psychedelic culture). (H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 1107 and RLST 1105.

 

RLST 1150: Elementary Biblical Hebrew
Introduction to Hebrew grammar, with reading exercises from Old Testament passages.

 

RLST 2115: The Development of Western Morality

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course explores the development of moral systems in Western society with special emphasis on the role of the Judeo-Christian religious tradition in establishing norms and values. It also examines ethical theory. (Students who have taken RLST 2315 will not be permitted to take this course for credit.)

 

RLST 2205 - The World's Living Religions

Area 3 - World Religions

This course examines the history and meaning of the major living religions of the world and at the same time attempts to explore the unique contribution of each to our understanding of religion as a whole. This elective course is of interest to students in the English-Language Bachelor of Education program and counts toward the 18 required credits in integration courses for this program. (S) (lec 3) cr 6.

 

RLST 2355: God, Play and Games
This course examines the shape and religious significance of leisure in Western society. The course primarily focuses on those elements in Christian thought and tradition, i.e. the feast, the holy day and worship, which together contribute to the contemporary view of leisure as celebration. (H) (lec 3) cr 6.

 

RLST 2446: Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication, Part I

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course will consider the nature and meaning of interpersonal communication as dialogue. Resources in the Judaeo-Christian tradition as well as recent phenomenological thought will be explored to enhance communication skills such as self-awareness, self-disclosure, listening and responding. A developmental model of interpersonal communication will also be presented involving: exchange, interchange, intimacy and communion. Cross-listed as COST 2446.(H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 2446 and COST/RLST 2445 or COST 2446.

 

RLST 2447: Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication, Part II

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course will attempt to demonstrate how interpersonal communication can transform relationships in several contexts such as: marriage, family life, friendship and the workplace. It will also examine processes of resolving conflict in relationships through negotiation and collaboration. A theoretical model of transformation will be presented utilizing thought of several current Christian thinkers. Cross-listed as COST 2447.(H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 2447 and COST/RLST 2445 or COST 2447.

 

RLST 2625: Childhood: A Religious Perspective

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 

This course provides an introduction to and examines the religious ideas regarding children as well as the implications of these various concepts of childhood for both societal and personal beliefs and values.  In this course, students will be introduced to and encouraged to critically evaluate these theories regarding childhood in relation to the various belief systems that exist. Ideas and practices regarding children within major world religions will be explored however, stress will be placed on the Judaeo-Christian view of the child.   Students will be asked to engage with the contemporary views of childhood examining such issues as children’s rights and children’s liberation. Students will be encouraged to participate in variety of learning practices using such culture artifacts such as websites, films, music, improve, stream of consciousness writing, and textual media to help spur discussions and thoughts about the relevance of these theories to today’s society. (6 CR)

 

RLST 3141: Spirituality & Sex: Heavenly Pleasures And Earthly Delights

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 

This course examines the importance of sex to religious and spiritual life. Primarily focusing on Western culture and religious movements, this course will explore both ancient traditions and modern day lived experiences where issues of sex and sexuality intersect with particular religious traditions. It will highlight how religions promote, conceal, and employ sex and sexuality. (lec. 3) 3cr.

 

RLST 3177: Christianity and the Celtic Experience 

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course examines first, how pagan Celtic religion in Ireland shaped the incoming Christian influence into a unique religious synthesis - Celtic Christianity. Secondly, the course traces the spread of Celtic Christianity throughout the British Isles and study the distinct spirituality found in the lives of four saints: Patrick, Bridgid, Columbanus and Colomcille. Thirdly, the course looks at the current revival of Celtic Christianity in Britain and North America and compares its spirituality with other spiritual revivals. (H) (lec 3) cr 3. 

 

RLST 3196:  The Human Prospect: Technology and the Individual Experience 

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course examines, from a global perspective, the ongoing technological revolution, its impact now and in the future on the individual experience. It explores the meaning of moral responsibility and faith in a high-tech society in terms of the Christian understanding of the metaphors of stewardship and journey. Cross-listed as COST 3006 (H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 3196 and either RLST 3195 or COST 3006.

 

RLST 3197: The Human Prospect: Technology and Social Experience 

Area 2 - Western Religions

This course examines, from a global perspective, the ongoing technological revolution, its impact now and in the future on social institutions. It explores the meaning of moral responsibility and faith in a high-tech society in terms of the Christian understanding of the metaphors of stewardship and a global village. Cross-listed as COST 3007 (H) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 3197 and either RLST 3195 or COST 3007.

 

RLST 3215: Religion and the Arts

Area 3 - World Religions
The varieties of expression of religious myth and symbol throughout the development of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Particular reference is made to the religious use of the visual arts, architecture and music.

 

RLST 3245: Health, Healing and Spirituality

Area 3 - World Religions
This course examines critically the role of spirituality within different religion traditions in creating a holistic understanding of health and healing. Special consideration is given to the spiritual basis of complementary and alternative medicines as contrasted with convention Western allopathic medicine.

 

RLST 3315: Life Journeys: Transitions, Rites of Passage and Spirituality

Area 3 - World Religions

This course examines the life journey, and the roles of spirituality and rites of passage in critical life transitions such as birth, puberty, graduation, leaving home, marriage, mid-life, separation and divorce, retirement, institutionalization and death. (H) (lec 3) cr 6.

 

RLST 3316: Religion and the State in Canada

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 

A major determinant in the relationship between religion and the state is the beliefs and theologies of various religious groups. In Canada, these beliefs have resulted in a unique relationship differing from both the American and European models. This course explores the effects of religious belief in Canada on such issues as religion in government, religion and education, and religion and dissent. (H) (lec 3) cr 3.

 

RLST 3326: Religion and the Elderly

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 
This course is a study of the images of the elderly found in the religious traditions of the world, including the North American native people. Special attention is given to an examination of the spiritual needs of the elderly and how these needs might be addressed by religious and health care organizations.

 

RLST 3327: Ethical Issues for the Elderly

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 
This course explores issues for the elderly such as the adequacy of health care, financial security and protection from various forms of abuse. The course focuses on justice issues as well as quality of life concerns.

 

RLST 3336: Food, Ritual and Religion

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 
This course critically examines the role of food and eating as a way of creating and maintaining a coherent, cultural, and religious world view. Topics will include fasting, feasting, ritual cannibalism, gluttony, morality, resource allocation etc. Theoretical perspectives focusing primarily on Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions will allow students to explore how humans use food to articulate the role of the human and the divine in the world. Students will investigate the relationship between such topics as religion, culture, globalization, biodiversity, and technology.

 

 RLST 3356: Sport as Spiritual Practice

 Area 4 - Religion and Culture 

This course will examine a selection of sports narratives so as to develop an understanding of sport as spiritual practice. Three key concepts will be discussed: quest, encounter, and testimony, each of which contributes to the development and experience of spirituality in sport. (H) (lec 3) cr 3.

 

RLST 3615: Religion and the Person

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 
This course studies the psychological dimension of religion by introducing students to major 20th-century figures in the psychology of religion. The course also examines the basic theories of religious development and a variety of topics focusing on religious change such as conversion, mysticism and faith healing. (H) (lec 3) cr 6.

 

RLST 3696: Religious and Ethical Perspectives on Mass Communication

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 

This course outlines various theories and world views of mass communications, and examines issues with particular reference to questions of access, control and critical assessment of burgeoning information and communication order. Attention is given to case studies in key areas of media orientation, practice, and strategy, and their effect on values and beliefs.

 

RLST 4135: Special Readings in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition

Area 2 - Western Religions

 The course focuses on a limited number of thinkers or issues within the Judaeo-Christian tradition. PREREQ: RLST 2446/2447. (H) (lec 3) cr 6.

 

RLST 4365: Problems in the Study of Religion

Area 4 - Religion and Culture 
A course which concentrates exclusively on the methodological questions (exegetical, hermeneutical and phenomenological) raised by the study of religion in an academic context.

Head Shot of Alison Hood, Department Chair and Assistant Professor Religious Studies, Theology and Ethics at Huntington University

Professor Alison Hood
Department Chair / Assistant Professor
705 673 4126 ext. 212
Room 119
[email protected]